THESE ARE SYMPTOMS OF HEART ATTACK in women who have not known a lot

Is it possible to have a heart attack and not know it?
Yes. A heart attack can happen without even knowing it. You can understand why it is called a “silent” heart attack.

The symptoms of a silent heart attack are difficult to recognize
“As the name suggests, a silent heart attack is a heart attack:
no symptoms
minimal symptoms or
unknown symptoms,” says Deborah Eckery, MD, a clinical cardiologist at Austin Heart Hospital.
“But it’s similar to other heart attacks, where blood flow to parts of the heart is temporarily blocked, damaging the heart muscle and causing scarring.”

Ekeri regularly sees patients who come in complaining of fatigue and heart problems, and with the help of an MRI or EKG, he discovers that the person actually had a heart attack weeks or months ago.

“People with these so-called silent heart attacks have non-specific and subtle symptoms, such as:
indigestion or
a case of the common cold, or
They may think they’ve tightened a muscle in their chest or upper back.
It may not cause discomfort in the chest, it may be in the chin, back, or hands,” he said.
“Some people have long-lasting, extreme fatigue that is inexplicable. These are some of the unique symptoms of a heart attack, but people tend to ignore them or mistake them for something else.”

Causes of silent heart attacks in women
A silent heart attack occurs when blood flow is blocked by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries. Studies vary, but some suggest that silent heart attacks are more common in women than men.

Ekeri points out that women and their doctors are more likely to misdiagnose the symptoms of a silent heart attack with anxiety.

Risk factors for silent heart attacks in women
However, Ekeri says, the risk factors for a silent heart attack are the same as for a recognized heart attack, including:

including high blood pressure
high cholesterol
smoking
family history of heart disease
obesity
age
A silent heart attack can be just as dangerous as its obvious symptoms, Ekeri said. Because this event often leaves scars and damages the heart, it puts the person at risk for other heart problems. Also, because the subject was unaware of the treatment, the heart’s blood flow would not have been restored sooner, and the effect would have been greater because no medication had been administered.

What to do in case of a silent heart attack.
The “silence” of a silent heart attack is a complicating factor, and women often don’t know they’re having a medical emergency. If you notice the symptoms of a silent heart attack, stay calm and call 911 immediately. When you go to the hospital, be clear that you think it might be a heart attack, not anxiety. Advocate for yourself or, if possible, get someone to advocate for you.
How to prevent a silent heart attack.
Ekeri advises his patients to:

know risk factors,
know about their blood pressure and cholesterol,
exercise regularly and
Avoid smoking to reduce the risk of heart attack.
Most importantly, he warns them to listen to their bodies and see a doctor if something feels wrong.

A silent heart attack, also known as silent ischemia, is a heart attack with no symptoms, minimal symptoms, or unknown symptoms. A heart attack is not always obvious, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or cold sweats.

Is it possible to have a heart attack and not know it?
Yes. A heart attack can happen without even knowing it. You can understand why it is called a “silent” heart attack.

The symptoms of a silent heart attack are difficult to recognize
“As the name suggests, a silent heart attack is a heart attack:
no symptoms
minimal symptoms or
unknown symptoms,” says Deborah Eckery, MD, a clinical cardiologist at Austin Heart Hospital.
“But it’s similar to other heart attacks, where blood flow to parts of the heart is temporarily blocked, damaging the heart muscle and causing scarring.”

Ekeri regularly sees patients who come in complaining of fatigue and heart problems, and with the help of an MRI or EKG, he discovers that the person actually had a heart attack weeks or months ago.

“People with these so-called silent heart attacks have non-specific and subtle symptoms, such as:
indigestion or
a case of the common cold, or
They may think they’ve tightened a muscle in their chest or upper back.
It may not cause discomfort in the chest, it may be in the chin, back, or hands,” he said.
“Some people have long-lasting, extreme fatigue that is inexplicable. These are some of the unique symptoms of a heart attack, but people tend to ignore them or mistake them for something else.”

Causes of silent heart attacks in women
A silent heart attack occurs when blood flow is blocked by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries. Studies vary, but some suggest that silent heart attacks are more common in women than men.

Ekeri points out that women and their doctors are more likely to misdiagnose the symptoms of a silent heart attack with anxiety.

Risk factors for silent heart attacks in women
However, Ekeri says, the risk factors for a silent heart attack are the same as for a recognized heart attack, including:

including high blood pressure
high cholesterol
smoking
family history of heart disease
obesity
age
A silent heart attack can be just as dangerous as its obvious symptoms, Ekeri said. Because this event often leaves scars and damages the heart, it puts the person at risk for other heart problems. Also, because the subject was unaware of the treatment, the heart’s blood flow would not have been restored sooner, and the effect would have been greater because no medication had been administered.

What to do in case of a silent heart attack.
The “silence” of a silent heart attack is a complicating factor, and women often don’t know they’re having a medical emergency. If you notice the symptoms of a silent heart attack, stay calm and call 911 immediately. When you go to the hospital, be clear that you think it might be a heart attack, not anxiety. Advocate for yourself or, if possible, get someone to advocate for you.
How to prevent a silent heart attack.
Ekeri advises his patients to:

know risk factors,
know about their blood pressure and cholesterol,
exercise regularly and
Avoid smoking to reduce the risk of heart attack.
Most importantly, he warns them to listen to their bodies and see a doctor if something feels wrong.

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